NEWS BOARDMore News

This Week in Olympic Sport: March 17 to 23

This Week in Olympic Sport: March 17 to 23

The next seven days mark the busiest of the remaining weeks of the winter sport season with Kerry Barr bidding for a medal at the Women’s World ...

0 Comments

Full Article
This Week in Olympic Sport: March 10-16

This Week in Olympic Sport: March 10-16

British short track speed skater Elise Christie will return to the ice this week set on enjoying herself after a Winter Olympics to forget as we...

0 Comments

Full Article
GET INVOLVED: How to get into Winter Sports in the UK

GET INVOLVED: How to get into Winter Sports in the UK

Following the success of Team GB at the Sochi 2014 Olympic Winter Games which saw us win our best medal haul since the 1924 Chamonix Games, we h...

0 Comments

Full Article
Sochi 2014 Winter Olympic Sport Guide

Sochi 2014 Winter Olympic Sport Guide

With 98 events taking place at the Sochi 2014 Olympic Winter Games across 15 disciplines, here is the full run down of each winter discipline ac...

0 Comments

Full Article
This Week in Olympic Sport: January 27-February 2

This Week in Olympic Sport: January 27-February 2

The winter sport season is winding down as the Sochi 2014 Olympic Winter Games draw ever closer but we preview what is taking place this week.

0 Comments

Full Article

History

Norwegian nordic athlete Sondre Nordheim is credited with the first officially measured ski jump in 1860. The first ski jumping contest was held in Trysil, Norway, in 1862. Throughout the mid-1800’s, ski jumping was part of ski carnivals in Norway, but the sport gained added prestige when, in 1892, the Norwegian royal family decided to donate the “King’s Cup” trophy to the winner of the annual meet held in Holmenkollen.

The sport was brought to the United States by Norwegian emigrants, and the first ski jumping meet in the U.S took place Feb. 8, 1887. It was won by Norwegian emigrant Mikkel Hemmestvedt.

Technical

Individual normal hill

The only ski jumping event from the normal hill, which is 90 metres (about 295 feet) high. Each athlete takes two jumps, and the one with the greatest total score is declared the winner.

Individual large hill

This event is contested on the large hill, which measures 120 metres (394 feet). Each athlete takes two jumps, and the one with the greatest total score is declared the winner.

Team large hill

This event is contested on the large hill, which measures 120 metres (394 feet). There are four members on each team, and each athlete takes two jumps. The team with the highest total score over the eight jumps is declared the winner.

equipment

Ski jumpers wear specially designed aerodynamic suits, gloves and obligatory helmets. The ski suit is only allowed to be 5mm thick, limiting the amount of trapped air inside the suit and reducing the advantage this gives in lift and distance.

The length of the skis are permitted to be the height of the jumper plus 80cm. The bindings must be placed so that the distance from toe to ski tip is no more than 57% of the total length of the ski.

The underside of the skis have a groove to keep them straight down the in-run. The skis are also hollow inside and than their alpine counterparts to allow more life in flight.

rules

Competition format

Individual Hill

In the Individual normal-hill and individual large-hill competitions there is a Trial run before a Qualifying run where the participants are reduced to 50 (the top 15 from the current World Cup standings are automatically qualified.) The competition itself has two jumps but only the top 30 after the first jump will take the second jump. Each jump is scored for distance and style. The two scores are added together and the competitor with the highest total after the two runs is declared the winner.

Team

In the Team competition, for both the trial round and the two competition rounds, there are four groups. One jumper from each team is entered per group. Each team decides the order in which its jumpers will start. The competitors must remain in the same group in the trial round and both competition rounds. In the second round only the leading 8 nations from the first round are entitled to start.

Our Results

Total: 0 medals
  • 0 Gold
  • 0 Silver
  • 0 Bronze
Calgary 1988
  • 0 Gold
  • 0 Silver
  • 0 Bronze
Salt Lake City 2002
  • 0 Gold
  • 0 Silver
  • 0 Bronze
View More