NEWS BOARDMore News

Tait has gold on his mind ahead of 100th GB appearance

Tait has gold on his mind ahead of 100th GB appearance

Ashley Tait insists Great Britain are hellbent on claiming a World Championship Division One B gold medal as the forward prepares to make his 10...

0 Comments

Full Article

History

The word “hockey” comes from the old French word “hocquet”, meaning “stick”. The origins of ice hockey are unclear, but it is widely accepted that the British are responsible for bringing hockey to North America. Soldiers stationed in Nova Scotia, Canada, played the earliest games.

In 1879, a group of college students at McGill University in Montreal organised competitions and developed the first known set of hockey rules. The sport migrated south to the United States during the 1890s. The first known hockey games took place between John Hopkins and Yale Universities in 1895. The first Olympic Games to include Ice Hockey for men were the Antwerp Games in 1920. However, the first Olympic Winter Games took place in 1924 in Chamonix. Women’s Ice Hockey was introduced to the Winter Olympics at the 1998 Games at Nagano.

 

Olympic History

The first Olympic Games to include ice hockey for men were the Antwerp Summer Games in 1920. Four years later it was part of the first Winter Olympic Games in Chamonix and has remained on the program ever since.

Women’s ice hockey made its debut at the Winter Olympics at Nagano 1998. In another first for the sport, professional players from the world's premier competition, the National Hockey League of North America, played in the Nagano Games.

 

Technical

The competition is comprised of two phases, a preliminary round and a play-off round. The first is a round robin format with two groups of six teams for the Men’s tournament and two groups of four teams for the Women’s tournament. Each team plays the other teams in their group once.

Advancing to the play-off round are the top four ranked teams in each group for the men and the top two teams from each group for the women. There are quarterfinals, semi-finals and games for the gold/silver and bronze medals.

equipment

Stick

Ice hockey players use a stick that is 152cm long and that can be made of wood or metal. Its blade is covered with a special material to prevent the puck from slipping. The puck is a hard rubber disk that the players hit with their stick. The puck itself is 2.54cm thick and 7.62cm in diameter. It weighs between 156 – 170 kg and reach speeds of 160km/h.

Clothing

Players wear head guards and a series of protective pads underneath their clothing, including those for the shoulders, knees and elbows, as well as shin guards and large gloves. Their skates are leather and lace up over the ankle. Ice hockey skates have a short blade to allow for quick turns. They are 3mm thick.

The goal-keeper wears additional protection, including complete leg and body pads as well as a helmet and metal visor. The stick is also longer than the blade used for general play – 39cm instead of 32cm.

rules

Competition Format

The tournaments include a preliminary stage, final and playoffs. Medals are contested in Gold/Silver and Bronze matches.

Players

A team must not have more than six players on the ice while play is in progress. As a player may be sent off the ice as a penalty a smaller number may be in play. The players are typically: a goalkeeper, two defenders, two wings and a centre.

Duration

A regular game consists of three 20-minute periods, separated by 15 minute intermissions, with players changing ends for each period.

 

Our Results

Total: 1 medals
  • 0 Gold
  • 0 Silver
  • 1 Bronze
Chamonix 1924
  • 0 Gold
  • 0 Silver
  • 1 Bronze
St Moritz 1928
  • 0 Gold
  • 0 Silver
  • 0 Bronze
St Moritz 1948
  • 0 Gold
  • 0 Silver
  • 0 Bronze
View More