NEWS BOARDMore News

Weightlifter Smith already looking to Rio Olympics

Weightlifter Zoe Smith admits thoughts of starring at the 2016 Rio Olympics are already at the forefront of her mind.

Smith enjoyed her O...

0 Comments

Full Article

History

The practice of lifting heavy stones to determine one’s strength commenced in ancient times. This practice has continued down through the ages and in many strongman contests today heavy stones are lifted, or attempted to be lifted. Modern weightlifting started in Germany in the mid-1800s and quickly spread through the rest of Continental Europe and beyond. The International Weightlifting Federation was founded in 1905.

 

Olympic History

Weightlifting featured in the first modern Olympics in Athens in 1896. The two events in 1896 were the one-handed lift and the two-handed lift and they were open to all competitors regardless of their weight. The sport appeared again at St Louis 1904 (and in the Intercalated Olympics in Athens in 1906) and then at Antwerp 1920 after which it commenced an unbroken run on the Olympic program. Women’s weightlifting was added to the Olympic program in Sydney in 2000.

Technical

Weightlifting consists of two movements executed in a standard order: first the snatch and then the clean jerk. There are both men and women Weightlifting events. Each athlete has the right to three attempts for each movement. The athlete’s best performances in both movements are put together to determine the final placement.

equipment

The basic items of equipment for competition Weightlifting are:

  • The bar: This consists of the bar (or axle) itself; the disks; and the collars. The men’s bar weighs 20 kg and is 2.2 m long; the women’s bar weighs 15 kg and is 2.1 m long.
  • The platform: This is the surface on which the competitors execute their movements. It is square and measures 4 x 4 m.
  • The electronic system for referee and jury decisions
  • The timekeeping apparatus
  • The attempts score sheet
  • The competition scoreboard
  • The record table

rules

Weightlifting consists of two movements: the snatch and the clean jerk. Athletes compete in categories according to their body weight. According to International Weightlifting Federation (IWF) rules, in competitions the athlete’s performances in both movements are put together to determine the final placement.

Techniques

The techniques for the two Weightlifting movements are as follows:

Snatch

The competitor lifts the bar overhead in a single motion. In the attempt to lift the bar, the knees may bend, and the legs may split, but no other part of the body may touch the ground. Once the bar is lifted overhead, the competitor must remain motionless, arms and legs extended, with bar and body in a straight line, until given the green light by the referees.

Clean and jerk

This is a two-part lift. In the first (the ‘clean’) part, the weight is brought from the ground to shoulder-level in one motion. In the attempt to lift the weight, the knees may bend and the legs may be split. In the second (the ‘jerk’) the competitor bends the knees, at the same time extending the arms upwards, thus lifting the bar overhead. When the movement is complete, the competitor must remain absolutely motionless until the signal from the referees is green.

Team HeroesEntire Team

Starting out as a gymnast, Zoe Smith first participated in weightlifting aged 12 after being asked to make up the numbers for the Greenwich team at the London Youth Games.

Smith finished fourth in the 58kg at the European Championships ...

Our Results

Total: 5 medals
  • 0 Gold
  • 2 Silver
  • 3 Bronze
Berlin 1936
  • 0 Gold
  • 0 Silver
  • 0 Bronze
London 1948
  • 0 Gold
  • 1 Silver
  • 1 Bronze
Helsinki 1952
  • 0 Gold
  • 0 Silver
  • 0 Bronze
Melbourne 1956
  • 0 Gold
  • 0 Silver
  • 0 Bronze
Rome 1960
  • 0 Gold
  • 0 Silver
  • 1 Bronze
Tokyo 1964
  • 0 Gold
  • 1 Silver
  • 0 Bronze
Mexico City 1968
  • 0 Gold
  • 0 Silver
  • 0 Bronze
Munich 1972
  • 0 Gold
  • 0 Silver
  • 0 Bronze
Montreal 1976
  • 0 Gold
  • 0 Silver
  • 0 Bronze
Moscow 1980
  • 0 Gold
  • 0 Silver
  • 0 Bronze
Los Angeles 1984
  • 0 Gold
  • 0 Silver
  • 1 Bronze
Seoul 1988
  • 0 Gold
  • 0 Silver
  • 0 Bronze
Barcelona 1992
  • 0 Gold
  • 0 Silver
  • 0 Bronze
Atlanta 1996
  • 0 Gold
  • 0 Silver
  • 0 Bronze
Sydney 2000
  • 0 Gold
  • 0 Silver
  • 0 Bronze
Athens 2004
  • 0 Gold
  • 0 Silver
  • 0 Bronze
Beijing 2008
  • 0 Gold
  • 0 Silver
  • 0 Bronze
London 2012
  • 0 Gold
  • 0 Silver
  • 0 Bronze
View More