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Allen secures Rio quota place with World Champs skeet silver

Elena Allen admitted she had to pinch herself in amazement as she picked up a women’s skeet silver medal at the Shooting World Championships in ...

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Countdown to Rio: Summer sports week in review

Tiffany Porter made sure to end a successful season on a high as she broke Jessica Ennis-Hill’s British 100m hurdles record on the way to silver...

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Scott secures double trap bronze in Granada

Steve Scott insisted it was job done after claiming double trap bronze at the Shooting World Championships in Granada.

Commonwealth Games...

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Ling bags silver and Rio quota spot at Shooting World Champs

Ed Ling might have secured Team GB a quota place for the 2016 Rio Olympics with silver in the men’s trap at the World Championships, but he coul...

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Countdown to Rio: Commonwealth Games special

Home nation athletes excelled at the XX Commonwealth Games in Glasgow with England topping the medal table for the first time since 1986 while h...

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History

Shooting dates back to the Middle Ages, St Sebastianus Shooting Club in Cologne, Germany was formed in 1463. The Olympic disciplines of skeet and trap stem from "clay pigeon" shooting which has been a popular sport since the late 18th Century.

Olympic History

Shooting has appeared on every Olympic program except St Louis 1904 and Amsterdam 1928. The number and variety of events have changed many times over the Olympiads.

Oscar Swahn of Sweden was almost 73 years old when he won a silver medal as part of the Swedish running deer team at the Antwerp Games in 1920. Swahn is still the oldest Olympic medallist, and indeed competitor.

From Mexico City 1968, women started competing with men in a number of Olympic shooting events. The first woman medallist was Margaret Murdock from the United States in the small-bore rifle (three positions) at Montreal 1976. Murdock finished second to countryman Lenny Bassham after a count-back.

A limited number of women’s events were first included at Los Angeles 1984. Until Barcelona 1992, women were still permitted to compete in those events that were not included in their program. From Atlanta 1996, the Olympic shooting program has been segregated.

Technical

 

There are 15 events in the Olympic programme which fall into three disciplines: Rifle, Pistol, and Shotgun events. In Rifle and Pistol events, competitors aim at a 10-ring target from a set distance (10m, 25m or 50m).

Depending on the event, athletes are required to shoot from standing, kneeling or prone (lying down) positions. In Shotgun events, competitors shoot at moving clay targets launched above and in front of them.

equipment

Shotgun

Targets
In the Clay Target events, the target is a clay disc of 11cm diameter, 25-26mm thickness, and 105gr weight. Discs are released from a single or double trap, or, in the case of skeet, they may be released from a high or a low house.

Clothing
In the Clay Target events, there is no special outfit for trap and double trap competitors. Skeet competitors, however, must have a line on their clothing at hip level so that it is possible to see whether the stock of the gun is above the hip or not as they wait to fire.

Arms
The Clay target events are done with a shotgun.

Ammunition
For Clay Target the normal ammunition is a 12-gauge cartridge, weighing not more than 24gr.

Pistol

Targets
Electronic targets are used for all pistol events.

Clothing
Competitors are not obliged to wear special Shooting clothing, but may wear Shooting shoes.

Arms
Competitors with a pistol, which may be an air pistol or a small bore pistol. The air pistol is used for 10m events. The small-bore pistol is used for 25m and 50m events.

Ammunition
The ammunition used in 10-metre events is 4.5mm cartridges. For 25 and 50-metre events, 5.6mm bullets are used.

Rifle

Targets
Electronic targets are used for all rifle events.

Clothing
Competitors must wear Shooting clothing made according to ISSF regulations and of a specified thickness and toughness of material.

· Shooting jacket

· Shooting trousers

· Shooting shoes

· Shooting glove

Arms
Competitors fire either with a rifle. This may be an air rifle or a small bore rifle. The air rifle is used for the 10m events. The small-bore rifle is used for the 50m events.

Ammunition
The ammunition used in 10-metre events is 4.5mm cartridges. For 25 and 50-metre events, 5.6mm bullets are used.

rules

The rules of Shooting vary according to the discipline, distance, and types of target and arm, firing position, number of shots and the time within which the shots have to be fired. Special rules are applied to determine ranking in the event of a tie.

Each discipline consists of a qualification and a final round. The score in the final round is added to the competitor’s score in the qualification round and the winner is the competitor with the most points at the end of the match.

Shotgun

In all shotgun events (trap, skeet and double trap) shooters stand in stations and fire at the clay targets, shaped like flying saucers, as they are released on the shooters’ signals. In each event, the targets are propelled at high speed, and the person who hits the most wins.

Trap

In the Trap events, named after the device that fires the clay targets into the air, a bank of three traps set at different heights and angles sits within the trench in front of each shooter. The heights vary, and the shooter does not know which of the three traps will release next. As each target is released, the shooter is allowed two shots.

Shooters move through a series of five adjacent Shooting stations.

In squads of six, they move round clockwise to the five firing stations, with five taking their place on the stations and the sixth waiting his or her turn behind the competitor on station 1.

The clay targets are released at speed, covering a distance of 75 metres with a trajectory height of two to four metres. Every shooter has the right to attempt two shots at each clay target while it is in the air. In Men’s Trap competitors shoot at 125 targets; in Women’s Trap, at 75 targets.

The six best competitors from the qualification round advance to the final and they shoot 25 clay targets.

Double trap

The only difference from the single trap is that two targets are released simultaneously from the left and right traps of the central station, reaching a height of some three to three and a half metres. Every competitor must shoot at both targets. In Men’s Double Trap, competitors shoot at 150 clay targets; in the Women’s event, at 120.

The six best competitors from the qualification round advance to the final. Men shoot 50 clay targets and Women 40.

Skeet

The two clay targets are released from separate trap houses at either end of a semicircular Shooting range. The releasing procedure involves single and double targets thrown from two houses, a ‘low house’ and a ‘high house’. Competitors have the right to take one shot at each target.

The shooter holds the shotgun at hip level until the target appears, whereupon he or she raises the shotgun to shoulder and fires. Skeet uses eight Shooting stations: seven on the circumference of what is virtually a semicircle, and one in the middle. In Men’s Skeet competitors shoot at 125 clay targets; in the Women’s event, at 75.

The six best competitors from the qualification round advance to the final and they shoot 25 clay targets.

 

Pistol

The pistol events include one at 50 metres, two at 25 metres, and two at 10 metres. Electronic targets are used for all events.

Pistol events are scored the same as rifle events, with competitors aiming at a 10-ring target. Pistol shooters use a standing position and must hold and fire the gun with the one hand, with the wrist clearly free of support.

Men’s 50 m pistol

Sixty shots are fired at a target 50 metres away, and must be completed within 120 minutes. An unlimited number of sighting shots are permitted before the match begins. The eight best competitors from the qualification round advance to the final, which consists of 10 shots within75 seconds for each.

Men’s 25 m rapid fire pistol

Two rounds of 30 shots (in six series of five shots each) are fired at a target 25 metres away. The first two series must be completed within a time of 8 seconds each; the second two within 6 seconds; and the last two within 4 seconds. The six best competitors from the qualification round advance to the final, which consists of two series of five shots within 4 seconds each.

Women’s 25 m pistol

This discipline consists of six series of five precision shots, and six series of five rapid-fire shots. Each precision series must be completed within five minutes, while each shot of the rapid fire series must be completed within 3 seconds. The eight best competitors from the qualification round advance to the final, which consists of ten rapid fire shots.

10 m air pistol

Shots are fired at a target 10 metres away: 60 shots within 105 minutes for men, with unlimited sighting shots, and 40 shots within 75 minutes for women, practice shots included. The eight best competitors from the qualification round advance to the final, which consists of ten shots with 75 seconds for each.

 

Rifle

There are two rifle disciplines at a 10-metre range and three at a 50-metre range, each with an electronic target.

Scoring

In a rifle discipline, the competitor fires from either a prone, a standing, or a kneeling position, earning points with his/her shots at a 10-ring target (10 for the centre ring, 9 for the next one, and so on). In the final, each ring is subdivided into ten score zones and the highest possible score is10.9.

Men’s 50 m rifle three positions

Athletes fire 40 shots each prone, standing and kneeling at a target 50 metres away, within 45 minutes (prone), 75 minutes (standing), and 60 minutes (kneeling). An unlimited number of sighting shots are permitted before the match begins. The eight best competitors from the qualification round advance to the final, which consists of 10 shots within a time limit of 75 seconds in the standing position.

Men’s 50 m rifle prone

Sixty shots are fired from the prone position at a target 50 metres away, within 75 minutes. An unlimited number of sighting shots are permitted before the match begins. The eight best competitors from the qualification round advance to the final, which consists of ten shots with 45 seconds for each.

Women’s 50 m rifle three positions

Competitors fire twenty shots each in the prone, standing and kneeling positions at a target 50 metres away, within a time limit not more than 135 minutes. An unlimited number of sighting shots are permitted before the match begins. The eight best competitors from the qualification round advance to the final, which consists of ten shots with 75 seconds for each in standing position.

10 m air rifle

In both events (men’s and women’s) shots are fired standing at a target 10 metres away: 60 shots within 105 minutes for men, with unlimited sighting shots; 40 shots within 75 minutes for women (sighting shots included in this time). The eight best competitors from the qualification round advance to the final, which consists of 10 shots with 75 seconds for each competitor.

Team HeroesEntire Team

Peter Wilson rose to number one in the world in 2011 after winning silver and gold on the World Cup circuit.

This March he set a new world record of 198 hits out of 200 on the way to gold at a World Cup event in Arizona.

Since 2...

Our Results

Total: 37 medals
  • 14 Gold
  • 15 Silver
  • 8 Bronze
Athens 1896
  • 0 Gold
  • 0 Silver
  • 0 Bronze
Paris 1900
  • 0 Gold
  • 0 Silver
  • 0 Bronze
London 1908
  • 6 Gold
  • 7 Silver
  • 0 Bronze
Stockholm 1912
  • 1 Gold
  • 4 Silver
  • 4 Bronze
Antwerp 1920
  • 0 Gold
  • 0 Silver
  • 0 Bronze
Paris 1924
  • 1 Gold
  • 2 Silver
  • 0 Bronze
Los Angeles 1932
  • 0 Gold
  • 0 Silver
  • 0 Bronze
Berlin 1936
  • 0 Gold
  • 0 Silver
  • 0 Bronze
London 1948
  • 0 Gold
  • 0 Silver
  • 0 Bronze
Helsinki 1952
  • 0 Gold
  • 0 Silver
  • 0 Bronze
Melbourne 1956
  • 0 Gold
  • 0 Silver
  • 0 Bronze
Rome 1960
  • 0 Gold
  • 0 Silver
  • 0 Bronze
Tokyo 1964
  • 0 Gold
  • 0 Silver
  • 0 Bronze
Mexico City 1968
  • 1 Gold
  • 0 Silver
  • 0 Bronze
Munich 1972
  • 0 Gold
  • 0 Silver
  • 1 Bronze
Montreal 1976
  • 0 Gold
  • 0 Silver
  • 0 Bronze
Moscow 1980
  • 0 Gold
  • 0 Silver
  • 0 Bronze
Los Angeles 1984
  • 2 Gold
  • 0 Silver
  • 3 Bronze
Seoul 1988
  • 1 Gold
  • 1 Silver
  • 0 Bronze
Barcelona 1992
  • 0 Gold
  • 0 Silver
  • 0 Bronze
Atlanta 1996
  • 0 Gold
  • 0 Silver
  • 0 Bronze
Sydney 2000
  • 1 Gold
  • 1 Silver
  • 0 Bronze
Athens 2004
  • 0 Gold
  • 0 Silver
  • 0 Bronze
Beijing 2008
  • 0 Gold
  • 0 Silver
  • 0 Bronze
London 2012
  • 1 Gold
  • 0 Silver
  • 0 Bronze
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