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Diver Daley relishing chance to compete in London again

Tom Daley now calls London home and the Olympic bronze medallist is eager to prove he can keep his head above water in the capital when he retur...

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History

Depictions on historic artefacts tell us that people have been diving from high cliffs into water since ancient times, but modern professional diving developed more recently in Europe between the late 17th century and early 19th century as acrobats practised their routines over water. The Swedes and the Germans pioneered early technique, but as the popularity of the sport spread, it became a truly global sport.

Olympic History

‘Fancy diving’ was first included on the Olympic rosta with the addition of the men’s 10m platform event for the 1904 Summer Games in St Louis, USA. The first champion was home-town hero George Sheldon, a 30-year-old eye doctor.

Over the next few years, more individual events for men and women – such as the 3m springboard – were added. From 1928, though, the diving programme was unchanged until 1996.

For the 2000 Summer Games in Sydney, the men’s and women’s synchronised diving events were added to the schedule, adding a new interpretation to the classic event.

Since the early 1990’s China has shown dominance in the sport and prior to this the United States. Perhaps the greatest was US diver was Greg Louganis who, in 1988, cracked his head on the springboard while attempting a reverse 2.5 pike, but went on to win gold in both men’s events despite this.

Technical

Diving calls for both physical and technical ability. All competitive diving is from springboards set at one metre and three metres above the surface of the water or from firmboards (platforms) set at 5, 7.5 and 10metres. However, all major competitions (such as the Olympics) use the 10 metre platform only and the 3m springboard.

Divers perform a series of figures, each of which has an assigned degree of difficulty, before entering the water with as little disturbance as possible (rip entry).

The routine and the order in which the divers perform their dives are recorded on a diving list. The judging panel consists of seven judges for individual events and 11 judges for synchronised diving events. They give their score based on the degree of difficulty and ease displayed by the athletes while performing their programme.

Synchronized diving is performed by a pair of divers, who try to execute their moves with perfect coordination in take-off (both height and distance from the board), the speed of rotation, the plunge and the angle of entry into the water. Five judges will judge the synchronisation of the dive, 3 will judge the execution of one diver and 3 will judge the execution of the other diver.

equipment

Pool

An Olympic diving pool has to be a minimum depth of 4.5 metres but the preferred depth is 5 metres (16 ft 4 in) deep.

Springboard

The springboard must be a minimum of 4.8 metres (15ft 8in) long and 0.5 metres (1ft 8in) and should have a non slip surface. The flexibility of the springboard should be fully adjustable.

Platform

The fixed platform must be a minimum of 6 metres 19ft 8 ins (21ft) long and 2 3 metres (9ft 10in) metres. The surface must be non-slip.

rules

The rules used for judging and scoring an Olympic diving contest are dictated by FINA, the international governing body for the aquatics and the body that oversees the sport of diving.

Springboard Diving

- All springboard diving in the Olympic Games is contested from the 3-meter springboard.
- Men must complete six dives.
- Women must complete five dives.
- There is no limit on the total degree of difficulty for these dives.
- At least one dive during the contest must come from each of five different categories – forward, back, reverse, inward, and twisting.
- Men may repeat one of the categories for their sixth dive, women may not.
- No dive can be repeated in a list of dives.
- The sixth optional dive for the men may be chosen from any of the categories.

Platform Diving

- Men must complete six dives.
- Women must complete five dives.
- There is no limit on total degree of difficulty for these dives.
- For the men, at least one dive during the contest must come from each of five different six different categories – forward, back, reverse, inward, twisting and armstand.
- No category can be repeated in a list of dives.
- All dives must be competed from the 10-meter platform.
- Synchronized Springboard and Platform Diving
- Women must complete five dives.
- Men must complete six dives.
- The first two dives for both the men and women are assigned a degree of difficulty of 2.0.
- The remaining three dives for the women and four dives for the men have no limit on the degree of difficulty.
- Both men and women must compete dives that come from at least four different categories, with at least one dive facing forward and that dive cannot be performed from a standing position on the springboard.
- Within the men’s six dives, a category cannot be used more than twice.

Judging

A judge in a diving contest shall award from 0 to 10 points for a dive according to his or her overall impression.

When judging a dive, the judge must not be influenced by any factor other than the technique and execution of the dive. The dive must be considered without regard to the approach to the starting position, the difficulty of the dive, or any movement beneath the surface of the water.

The following elements must be considered with equal importance by judge before awarding a score:

- the starting position and the approach
- the take-off
- the flight
- the entry

Synchronized diving competition involves two competitors diving simultaneously from the springboards or platform. The competition is judged on how the two divers individually perform their dives, and how the two divers as a team synchronize their performance.

The factors to be considered when judging synchronized diving are:

- the starting position, the approach and the take-off, including the similarity of the height
- the coordinated timing of the movements during the flight
- the similarity of the angles of the entries
- the comparative distance from the springboard or platform of the entry
- the coordinated timing of the entries

Team HeroesEntire Team

Tom Daley began diving aged seven and in 2004 he became the youngest ever under-18 champion at the national championships. Daley competed internationally for the first time at the Australian Youth Olympic Festival three years later where he won...

Our Results

Total: 7 medals
  • 0 Gold
  • 2 Silver
  • 5 Bronze
London 1908
  • 0 Gold
  • 0 Silver
  • 0 Bronze
Stockholm 1912
  • 0 Gold
  • 0 Silver
  • 1 Bronze
Antwerp 1920
  • 0 Gold
  • 1 Silver
  • 0 Bronze
Paris 1924
  • 0 Gold
  • 0 Silver
  • 1 Bronze
Amsterdam 1928
  • 0 Gold
  • 0 Silver
  • 0 Bronze
Berlin 1936
  • 0 Gold
  • 0 Silver
  • 0 Bronze
London 1948
  • 0 Gold
  • 0 Silver
  • 0 Bronze
Helsinki 1952
  • 0 Gold
  • 0 Silver
  • 0 Bronze
Melbourne 1956
  • 0 Gold
  • 0 Silver
  • 0 Bronze
Rome 1960
  • 0 Gold
  • 0 Silver
  • 2 Bronze
Tokyo 1964
  • 0 Gold
  • 0 Silver
  • 0 Bronze
Mexico City 1968
  • 0 Gold
  • 0 Silver
  • 0 Bronze
Munich 1972
  • 0 Gold
  • 0 Silver
  • 0 Bronze
Montreal 1976
  • 0 Gold
  • 0 Silver
  • 0 Bronze
Moscow 1980
  • 0 Gold
  • 0 Silver
  • 0 Bronze
Los Angeles 1984
  • 0 Gold
  • 0 Silver
  • 0 Bronze
Seoul 1988
  • 0 Gold
  • 0 Silver
  • 0 Bronze
Barcelona 1992
  • 0 Gold
  • 0 Silver
  • 0 Bronze
Atlanta 1996
  • 0 Gold
  • 0 Silver
  • 0 Bronze
Sydney 2000
  • 0 Gold
  • 0 Silver
  • 0 Bronze
Athens 2004
  • 0 Gold
  • 1 Silver
  • 0 Bronze
Beijing 2008
  • 0 Gold
  • 0 Silver
  • 0 Bronze
London 2012
  • 0 Gold
  • 0 Silver
  • 1 Bronze
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