Farah on track for distance double

08 August 2012 / 13:44

Mo Farah feels there is a target on his back following his Olympic 10,000m triumph, but vowed to give everything in his bid for an historic long-distance double in London.

Farah was made to work hard in his heat of the 5,000m, eventually finishing third in 13 minutes 26 seconds to reach Saturday's final.

"I am definitely tired and I think it showed out there," the 29-year-old said. "The legs didn't feel great but that is what happens. Hopefully I will recover well and look forward to the final, forget about what I have done and rest up."

Farah went on: "It was a really rough race. It was like being in the ring with Anthony Ogogo! As soon as they saw me there was a lot of barging and pushing. I got caught so many times. There is definitely a target. I am the Olympic champion over 10,000 metres. You just have to accept it. Hopefully the final won't be as rough because we won't have so many guys."

Farah is the first British man to win Olympic gold in the 10,000m, while he will be aiming to follow in the footsteps of Ethiopia's Kenenisa Bekele (2008) by claiming the long-distance double. He insisted he had not thought about withdrawing from the 5,000m despite the draining effects of last Saturday, when he won Britain's third gold in the space of 45 minutes.

"By the time I got back it was a late night and there was a lot of emotion," he said. "It is something I had never done before and now I know how much it takes out of you.

"[Now] there is zero pressure. I am not putting any pressure on myself. I want to do well for the crowd because the support drives you further. Whatever I do I will give 100%. I am full of confidence and having the home crowd will definitely drive me more."

Team-mate Nick McCormick actually ran quicker than Farah in the considerably faster second heat, but could only finish 12th in 13:25.70 to miss out on a place in the final as a faster loser.

"I've got something to be proud of, I'll have no regrets in 20, 30 years when I'm sitting there," McCormick, 30, said. "I was finishing strong, I just learned on that penultimate lap you've got to stay in contact.

"It's a fantastic atmosphere, it was over too quickly and it's not often you say that about a 5k. I am just so proud of myself to be here. I've got to go away now and reflect and see where it went wrong and push on from here to Moscow (for the World Championships) next year. I really think I can make the final in Moscow."