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Experience key for Horsepool and British skaters in Dresden

Experience key for Horsepool and British skaters in Dresden

Performance director Stuart Horsepool wants his experienced short track speed skaters like Charlotte Gilmartin to lead by example as a host of B...

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Victorious Christie looking to push on from season opener

Victorious Christie looking to push on from season opener

Short track skater Elise Christie admitted she had enjoyed the perfect warm up for the World Cup Series as she picked up three golds and the ove...

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Christie takes gold on successful first day in Heerenveen

Christie takes gold on successful first day in Heerenveen

Great Britain short track performance director Stuart Horsepool believes early signs of rustiness were soon swept away on day one of the 2014 Sh...

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Britain's short track skaters primed for season opener

Britain's short track skaters primed for season opener

Great Britain short track performance director Stuart Horsepool is looking for his skaters to use this weekend’s 2014 Short Track Invitation Cup...

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Great Britain announce Short Track World Cup squad

Great Britain announce Short Track World Cup squad

Great Britain Short Track performance director Stuart Horsepool insists it is all systems go for the new World Cup season after announcing his s...

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History

Short track speed skating races began to occur in Europe shortly after speed skating became an established international sport. The International Skating Union was founded in 1892, three years after the first long-track World Championships.

Prior to the arrival of short track at the Olympics, it was common for skaters to compete in both short and long-track events. Short track ovals were covered and offered a place for skaters to train all year. When new indoor long-track facilities became available cross-sport training lost popularity. Now Short Track has become established as an Olympic Sport racers have been forced to specialise.

Olympic History

It was officially introduced to the Olympic program at the Albertville Games in 1992. There was one individual and one relay event for both men and women. At Salt Lake 2002, men’s and women’s 1500m events were added to the program.

Technical

At the Olympic Games there are eight short track speed skating events.

In the 500m and 1000m there are 32 participants and in the 1500m there are 36 participants. Races feature four/six skaters at a time in a mass start. For the 500m and 1000m there are heats, quarterfinals, semifinals and an A and B final. The A final determines the medals and the B final positions 5-8. For the 1500m there are heats, three semifinals and an A and B final.

A relay team comprises five members of which any four will compete in any one race, either the heat or final. In general, skaters contest one and a half laps apiece in the relay and take multiple turns on the ice in any order. Changeovers can occur anywhere on the course by touch or push. There are eight teams in the relays contesting two semifinals and the top two teams in each advance to the final.

500 metres

This four-and-a-half lap race is an all-out sprint. An explosive start is crucial because passing at high speeds is difficult. Individual heats feature four skaters at a time in a mass start.

1000 metres

A very tactical race. Skaters start out slowly and maneuver for the best position going into the homestretch. The skaters gradually speed up until they are at top speed for the last two or three laps of this nine-lap race. Individual heats feature four skaters at a time in a mass start.

1500 metres

The 1500 requires great stamina and strategy, since the heats, semis and final are contested in a single day. Each race consists of 13 1/2 laps. Individual heats feature six skaters at a time in a mass start.

3000 metres relay

The women’s relay consists of teams of four skaters who must complete 27 laps around the oval. It is common for each skater to sprint for one and a half or two laps at a time and take multiple turns on the ice. The relay is full of constant passing and spills and is the most exciting event in short track.  The finishing skater has to complete the final last 2 laps.

5000 metres relay

The men’s relay consists of teams of four skaters who must complete 45 laps around the oval. It is common for each skater to sprint for one and a half or two laps at a time and take multiple turns on the ice. The relay is full of constant passing and spills and is the most exciting event in short track.  The finishing skater has to complete the final last 2 laps.

 

Current Olympic Programme

Men

Women

500m

500m

1000m

1000m

1500m

1500m

5000m Relay

3000m Relay

 

equipment

Clothing

Skaters wear helmets, cut proof gloves and a cut proof race suit to protect themselves from injury. To grip the ice around turns, blades are especially important. The blades must be extremely sharp, bent in an arc, to assist direction in the turn. In addition short track blades are placed off centre to the left so the boot does not touch the ice when the skater leans into the turn.

 

Boots

Short track boots lace lower up the ankle than traditional ice hockey or figure skating boots and constructed from customised foot moulds. The materials used are a lot lighter. Due to the tight fitting of the moulded boots, some skaters choose not to wear socks.

rules

Competition Format

Skaters compete not against the clock, but against each other. Normally four/six skaters with those placed first and second advancing to the next round.

Individual competitions begin with 32/36 athletes and heats with four/six skaters in a mass start. They skate anti-clockwise and the first two advance to the next round although sometimes more than two advance depending on the number of heats and the nature of any qualifications. Final four compete for the medals in the 500m/1000m and six in the 1500m.

The Men’s and Women’s Relays have a semi final and finals competed for on separate days.

 

Competition Rules

Individual Racing Rules

The general racing rule is that the competitors by their way of skating shall contribute to the honest sporting and safe progress of the race in order to determine the result of the race on its merits. Breaches of the racing rules are considered as follows:

Races are run counter clockwise, that is to say the inner side of the track is on the left hand side of the skater;

Overtaking is allowed at all times, but until the Skaters are besides each other the responsibility for any obstruction or collision shall be upon the Skater overtaking, provided the Skater being overtaken does not act improperly;

When a Skater has been lapped once the Skater may continue his race, preferably on the outside of the track, provided this does not interfere with nor impedes with other competitors;

If a Skater is lapped twice, that Skater shall leave the race unless there are one or more other Skaters very close to his current race position.  Skaters who have left the race on basis of this rule shall be recorded as not finished.  If the Referee, at his discretion, feels that the Skater was prevented from finishing due to reasons beyond the Skaters control, then the Referee may declare the Skater having reached the finish, but no time shall be recorded;

A competitor or Team has completed the distance when the Skater has reached the finish line with the leading tip of the skate blade.

Infringements

The general racing rule is that the Competitors by their way of skating shall contribute to the honest sporting and safe progress of the race in order to determine the result of the race on its merits;

Breaches of the racing rules are consider as follows:

Off-track – shortening the distance to be skated with one or both skates on the left side of the curve, marked by track marking blocks;

Impeding – deliberately impeding, blocking, charging, or pushing another Competitor with any part of the body.  Interfere with another Skater by crossing his/her course thereby deliberately causing contact;

Assistance – each skater shall compete as an individual.  Any assistance from other Skaters will be cause for sanctions of all Skaters involved.  This will not apply to the push the Skater receives from their Team-mate in a Relay race;

Kicking out – deliberately kicking out of any skate during any part of a race thereby causing danger including at the finish line or throwing the body across the finish line is forbidden.

Relay Racing Rules

Teams consist of maximum 5 Competitors.  In any race 4 Competitors will skate as Team members;

For each race the Team can be composed of any four of the five Skaters originally named;

Each of the four Team-members must take part in the race;

All members of a Team shall be equally dressed.  Teams which do not comply with this shall be excluded from participation;

A Competitor will be in the race and be responsible for the Team until that Skater is relayed by a Team member.  Relaying will be by touch, this is to say a Competitor will not be in the race until that Skater has been touched by, or has touched the Competitor he is relieving;

A competitor may be relayed at any time except during the last two (2) laps.  These laps must be skated by one Skater.  A warning shot will be fired to indicate the start of the last three (3) laps;

In the case of a fall during the last two (2) laps, the Skater may be relayed.

 

Relay Infringements

The individual racing rules, paragraphs 1 and 2, shall apply to Relay races, that is to say for all members of the Team, both participating and relayed Team members;

Breaches of the relay racing rules are considered as follows:

Relaying non touch – the relay has taken place without a ouch or that the touch has not been obvious, clearly shown, and seen by the Referee or Assistant Referee;

Relaying during the last two (2) laps – the last relay has not been clearly started before the commencement of the final two laps.

 

Sanctions For Infringement of the Racing Rules

The term ‘disqualification’, shall be understood to describe the various sanctions mentioned in this Rule including without limitation the following type of sanctions;

Penalty – in the case of an infringement of the Racing Rules a penalty will be given.  The Skater/Relay Team will be disqualified in the relevant race in which the infringement occurred, and will be excluded from participating in the next round of the distance concerned.  The Skater/Relay Team will forfeit the points/result accrued in that race alone.  Points/results accrued prior to that race will not be affected.

Yellow Card – if an infringement of the Racing Rules is deemed by the Referee to be an unsafe, harmful or hazardous offense, a yellow card will be show to the infringing Skater.  The Skater/Relay Team will be disqualified in the relevant race in which the infringement occurred and excluded from participating in the next round of the distance concerned.  The Skater/Relay Team will forfeit prior points/results accrued in all races over the distance concerned.

Any Skater who is shown the yellow card twice in the same competition will be sanctioned by a red card, will be excluded from the competition immediately and will not be ranked in the final classification.

Red Card – In the case of an infringement which is deemed by the Referee to be intentionally dangerous or grossly negligent, the Skater will be shown a red card.

In the case a Skater is shown two yellow cards in the same competition, the Skater will be shown a red card.

For any action, either on or off ice, a red card may also be shown to the Skater.

The Skater who is shown a red card will be excluded immediately from the competition and will not be ranked in the final classification.  In the case a Skater is shown a red card in a Relay race, his Relay Team will be excluded immediately from the Relay competition and will not be ranked in the final Relay classification.  Individual sanctions for the Skater(s) concerned will also apply.

Disqualifications

The Referee shall be the Chief Executive Officer, and shall decide all points of dispute and infringements of rules, which can result in sanctions.  His decision shall be final.

The referee is empowered, amongst other things, to oversee the racing rules, to:

Add a Skater who was in a qualifying position to the next round if he feels that the Skater was prevented from qualifying due to:

an offense resulting in sanction;

any other reason not resulting from any direct or indirect action of the Skater concerned.

The Referee makes any advancement solely on discretion;

The Referee, at his discretion, before a decision is made, decides to view the Video Replay System at full speed, slow motion or still picture, with the exception of matters concerning the starting procedure.

The Referee shall decide when a touch has been “obvious” in Relay racing and should observe all relaying for this particular purpose, with the assistance of the Assistant Referees.

There are 2 other on ice referees:

The Assistant Referee appointed by the President will substitute in case the Referee is no longer able to do his job due to illness or injury;

The Assistant Referee(s) shall perform all duties and tasks as assigned by the Referee;

The Assistant Referee(s) must record their observations and must present their notes immediately after each qualifying round to the Referee.

The Assistant Referee Video:

Shall be located off the ice next to the Video Replay Operator;

Shall observe the Video Replay System during all races and report his observations to the Referee;

Must record his observations and must present the notes immediately after each qualifying round to the Referee.

Shall

Heat Box

Previous to each start the names of those about to compete are to be clearly called at the heat box.  Failure to appear promptly is equivalent to withdrawal from the competition concerned, except for medical reasons.

Skaters with defective equipment (e.g. broken skate blade) will not be allowed to start or re-start in any race.

Prior to the start of each semi-final over an individual distance, the participants are introduced by the announcer stating their full name and country. 

Prior to the start of a Final over an individual distance, the participants are introduced by the announcer stating their full name, country, and other information for the interest of the public.

Starting Procedure

On the command “go to the start” the Skaters shall place themselves at their respective dot at the starting line.  The Skaters have to stand still until the Starter calls “ready”, whereupon they have to take their starting position with the centre of the body over the respective dot and keep this position absolutely until the shot is fired;

However, if more than 5 Skaters are starting in a race, the starting dots will not be used, and the Starter will direct the Skaters in the respective order of their position to the starting line.

If due to the number of Skaters in a race a second row is required at the start then the Skaters at this line will be positioned as far as possible to the outside of the track in the order of the lane positions.

If a Skater takes his starting position before the command “ready” or leaves his position or moves any part of his body after the command “ready” and before the shot is fired, it is a false start.

If a Skater interfered with and falls before the first apex block after the starting line the Skaters shall be called back to make a new start.

If a false start takes place, the Skaters will be recalled with a second shot, or blast with a whistle.  The Skaters must return to the start line without delay.  The Skater shall identify the Skaters by line position number and shall indicate to the Skater(s) that they made a false start.

If all Skaters remain in the starting position despite a false start, the Starter shall re-start the race using only the command “ready”.  If the Skaters must be re-assembled for the start, the complete starting procedure shall be respected.  The Skater or Skaters who made the false start, will be assessed a false start.

If more than one Skater is responsible for a false start they shall all be assessed a false start.

If one of the Skaters breaks from his marks, thereby causing other Skaters to follow him, only the Skater at fault shall be assessed a false start.

After a false start the Starter shall tell a Skater that he has made a false start.  In the case of a second false start by the same Skater the Starter shall tell the Skater that he gets a penalty.

Any Skater that by his action, deliberately delays the start, shall be assessed a false start.

Team HeroesEntire Team

As a two-time Olympian, former European Champion and world record holder, Jon is the most experienced member of GB Short Track. The Solihull native began skating at just 18-months and soon developed a passion for ice hockey.

He was intr...

Our Results

Total: 2 medals
  • 0 Gold
  • 1 Silver
  • 1 Bronze
Albertville 1992
  • 0 Gold
  • 0 Silver
  • 0 Bronze
Lillehammer 1994
  • 0 Gold
  • 0 Silver
  • 1 Bronze
Nagano 1998
  • 0 Gold
  • 0 Silver
  • 0 Bronze
Salt Lake City 2002
  • 0 Gold
  • 0 Silver
  • 0 Bronze
Turin 2006
  • 0 Gold
  • 0 Silver
  • 0 Bronze
Vancouver 2010
  • 0 Gold
  • 0 Silver
  • 0 Bronze
Winter EYOF 2013
  • 0 Gold
  • 1 Silver
  • 0 Bronze
Sochi 2014
  • 0 Gold
  • 0 Silver
  • 0 Bronze
View More